Tag: how to build a dollhouse from scratch

December 24, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

How to build stairs.

I said before that this is not a blog about how to build a dollhouse, and for the most part, that’s true. But I think I found the ‘right’ way to build two elements: stairs, and egg carton stones. I’m not saying that there are no other ways to build these ‘correctly.’ I’m just saying I think if you follow these how-tos, you’ll end up with stairs, and stones that you can be proud of. There are a number of ‘right’ ways to build these things, this is one of them.

December 17, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

There’s no extra-credit for doing it the hard way.

This was easily the most important lesson I learned building this dollhouse. While details are (almost) always a net positive, that doesn’t mean you have to build things the hard way.

December 17, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

Focus on the windows.

On my first two dollhouses, the windows weren’t much more than holes in the walls. For this one, I wanted to frame them up a little more. This turned out to be a really great feature, and I think it makes the whole house stand out a lot more than it would if I hadn’t done this.

December 17, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

Craft Paper is Your Enemy.

I’ve talked about some things that are sticky, and that I found very helpful… so how about a sticky something that ended up being a PITA throughout the project? I wanted to wallpaper the rooms in the house this time instead of just painting the walls like I did in my other dollhouses. Apparently you can buy ‘dollhouse wallpaper’ but that seems frivolous to me, so instead, I found some craft paper that has small prints on it. I  cut that paper to fit the walls, and glued the paper directly onto the walls (yes, with wood glue.)

This is a bad idea.

December 17, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

Primer is Your Friend.

Priming your dollhouse. This is something that I did not do on the other dollhouses that I built because I wasn’t sure it was necessary. This time, I painted the whole thing white as I went, which ended up being a really great idea.

December 17, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

Masking Tape is Your Friend.

In order for the wood glue to really work it’s mojo, you have to clamp your join well. But in the world of miniature dollhouse things, unless you find itsy bitsy clamps, this can be a challenge. Enter… masking tape. Instead of relying on expensive tiny dollhouse clamps (do those even exist?) to hold the wood firmly together, just ‘clamp’ it with some masking tape. You’ll get the ability to clamp odd angles and tiny pieces, and when you’re finished the result is almost as solid as if it had been clamped over night.

December 17, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

Wood Filler is Your Friend.

The other great tool I use for building the dollhouse is wood filler, wood putty, plastic wood, miracle Minwax. This stuff fixes pretty much everything that I do wrong.

 

December 12, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

Wood Glue is Your Best Friend.

I have stumbled on a number of posts on the internet discussing what kinds of glue to use when building a dollhouse. I can’t speak for everyone, but for me – plain old yellow wood glue has been the go-to adhesive

December 11, 2017 / Dollhouse

Lesson Learned:

There are no useless details.

When I started building the dollhouse, I knew I wanted to incorporate as many details as possible. When I’m working on a painting, or print or web material, I frequently find that I have to dial it back a bit when it comes to adding stuff to the design. With dollhouses, I have found the opposite to be true.